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Country House with Curb Appeal in Hunter for $279,000

This one looks so pretty with those stone walls and established flower beds and the terrace overlooking the mountains. I’m already imagining all the sunset cocktails I’d drink. Plus,  it’s on 6.1 acres and located in the village of  of Hunter, so it would work well as a four season escape and occasional ski rental. Home sales are have been on the decrease for the past two years in Hunter, and this house is well below the average listing price of $384,00.

The inside has it’s pluses, too: four fireplaces, hardwood floors, a claw foot tub in one of the three bathrooms, but we didn’t love the interior as much as the exterior. It seemed a little too Twin Peaks ski lodge, not enough airy country house. How do you all feel about the wood paneling to regular walls ratio? At this price, I’d find a way to work with it, or renovate.

Village of Hunter, Google Maps

Distance to NYC: 114 miles; 2 hours, 30 minutes
Transportation: Adirondack Trailways to Hunter
Land: 6.1 acres
Neighbors? No
Water: No
Bedrooms: 4
Baths: 3

Snow White-ish Saugerties Stone Cottage

Can’t you just see the Seven Dwarfs stumbling out of this one? Maybe that’s because some of those exposed-beam ceilings look rather low. Other than that, it’s pretty hard to find fault with this tastefully updated 1700’s stone cottage. It’s on 12.7 wooded acres, which include a gurgling brook, private pond, a covered gazebo and two other outbuildings. It’s also in Saugerties, which I see as the Catskills’ answer to Cicely, Alaska. The list price is $259,000. I wonder how long this one will stay on the market …

Check Out This Sweet, Cheap Greene County Farmhouse

I fell in love with this eighteenth-century farmhouse when I was house hunting last spring, and it looks like it’s still on the market. I vaguely remember it was somewhere around $175,000 then, and the price has tumbled even further, to $159,000. It’s a lot of house for not much money, or at least a lot of bedrooms at a sweet price. There are five upstairs and one down, and the layout is a bit odd throughout: bedrooms opening up onto more bedrooms, a teeny bathroom under the front stairwell, an oddly situated servants’ staircase in the back.

While the upstairs was impracticable for privacy-loving twentieth-first century families, this house seemed like a blast for kids (and not surprisingly, the longtime owners had a bunch).  The tiny rooms, nooks and crannies, and endless wrap-around porch fit all my Anastasia Krupnik childhood fantasies of a creaky, beloved, bohemian old home.

We ended up deciding it was just too much house for us at this point in our lives, and we had reservations about Durham being too far from things to do, especially as we wanted year-round rentals. But I hope this house finds a family who can fill it. What would you do with this one?

Bungalow Envy: Lake Huntington Edition

In August of 2001, I dragged 15 New Yorkers up to Liberty, N.Y. to look at a bungalow colony for sale: 19 buildings, a weedy pool, 17 acres, which would have required each of us to put up $5,000. Yes, it’s the one (or the 19) that got away, if only because the real estate agent gave us bad directions and we never found it. The next week I took off for grad school in Arizona, and the bungalow colony dream died.

Or, rather, it slept. But in the last few years I’ve become aware that the dream is actually alive and well, with a number of bungalow colonies thriving Upstate. Most of them seem to be in Sullivan County, a fair drive west of the Hudson, which isn’t the best location for me, as it’s far from my brother in Tivoli (aka Shangri-la). Still, this one intrigues me. The Lake Huntington Summer Community, self-described as “a warm weather redoubt for generations of city dwellers looking for a fun, relaxing, affordable vacation,” has all that I dream of in a communal-ish vacation scheme. There’s the, you know, lake, plus a pool, woods and fields, tennis and tree houses, privacy and community, both, with emphasis on community. You can rent a place for as little as $650 a week, although the ones with the word “quiet” in the description give me pause about the potential loudness of the others. Read the rest of this entry

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